Mistress of Stitchjitsu

Over the weekend I finished my version of the Marsh Tee by Amy Palmer.Β  When I saw the pattern, it was love at first sight. I knew it was going to be a challenge, a real stretch of my current skill level, but when you’re in love ….

… all reason leaves you πŸ˜‚

So off I went in the direction of my dream. Quite boldly so, might I add 🀣

It was a bit of a tense affair. Like I said, I’m still new to lace knitting, this is but my 3rd attempt at it (here’s the 1st, and the second).Β  I started over 3 times I believe, getting further up the top each time. I wish there was a way you can rip off just a few wrong stitches (or offending rows) and go back seamlessly to a preferred point in the pattern [as with crochet]. Whenever I make a mistake in lace knitting I just frog all the way to stitch zero because the lace pattern is too confusing for me to decipher in a way that I can go back in without botching up the pattern.

Also, what is up with only noticing that you’ve made an error in the pattern when you’ve seamed both sides together already?!! Was the universe conspiring against me?! 🀨 (Could be that I’m just very excited to get this over with πŸ€”).

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In any case, if you are interested in making this beauty I would suggest that you stitch the back panel first, then the front. I did the front panel first, according to instructions. But when both front & back panels were finished there was a discrepancy in length (which was a surprise) that I had to add some more rows to the back panel. But since all the detail is in the back, this was not a very bright idea. Maybe should’ve ripped a few rows off the front panel instead (now why do I think of this just now πŸ˜†).

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I’m definitely wiser now 😁 and expect to do better next time. I learned how to make a V-neck this round too so, that’s a bonus. Having said this, methinks my next immediate projects will be crochet for the time being. I need to de-stress πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

No Tears Left to Cry

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I finished knitting this beauty a while ago but had to take a long pause (prior to sewing in the elastic band for the waistline) because this baby sucked every last drop of creative stamina out of me.

Note: I didn’t block this skirt prior to taking these pictures because at this point I just really want this project to be finished. (I’m feeling lazy 🀭 and I am kinda enjoying the quasi ruffled look of it at the moment).

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I seriously thought this skirt would never come to be. Lace knitting is still a challenge for me and this project definitely made me work. The design might look straightforward but I can assure you it is anything but. I must’ve frogged this baby 6, maybe even 7 times and it is only through sheer stubbornness (and hiding the project from a curious 10 month old) that I finally managed to finish. Ya ampun!

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I am proud as a peacock! After being nearly reduced to tears, thinking that this project was jinxed or something, and on the brink of giving up – I persevered because I wanted the lessons. No pain, no gain, honey. And definitely no sassy skirt πŸ˜‰

For novice knitters like me who want to take this project on, I recommend practicing with the lace pattern first (in the round, not flat because there’s a difference), before tackling the whole skirt. That and, definitely no distractions, but tonnes of patience & tenacity πŸ™‚

Get the free pattern here.

Knit Racerback Tee

I so love this project! As a neophyte knitter I often find myself wanting to take on more ambitious projects for the sake of furthering my skills. But I also have to be careful that they not be way beyond my current abilities that I give up in frustration.

Despite my expectations however, this pattern was quite easy to follow and execute. I give props to the writer who wrote clear & straightforward instructions – believe me, this matters a lot! And to have been able to make something like this, something I’m actually going to wear, feels uh-mazing!

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This tee was a great beginner exercise in shaping (I am still raving about how well the arm & neck shaping came out), as well as picking up stitches for finishing.

Shaping and finishing are skills that daunt me, and I want to understand them so they no longer scare me away from creating my masterpieces.